“The philanthropic spirit is so strong among the millennial population who want to do something more than just their day-to-day. That spirit really captures, I think, what the Friends program is all about.”

 

YOUNG DONOR SPOTLIGHT:
Joshua B. Friedman

Joshua B. Friedman grew up in Great Neck, New York and has made his home in New York City since graduating college in 2011. An associate in Legal and Compliance at BlackRock, he has served on the Friends of Mount Sinai advisory board since June of 2015.
 
How did you initially become involved with the Friends of Mount Sinai?
Both of my parents are doctors at Mount Sinai. My mother [Dr. Lynn Friedman, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science; father is Dr. Frederick Friedman, Jr., Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science] knew I was involved with my alma mater’s alumni club and that I was interested in other volunteer leadership opportunities and suggested this as a good next step.
 
Why has the Friends program proven a good fit?
It comes down to the people. The group is a good mix of individuals and couples. While many are in their 30s with children, there are also Friends in their 20s and 30s without children. Everyone is driven and passionate about Mount Sinai and the Friends program, and the energy is infectious.
 
How have you found substantive involvement with the Friends?
It has actually been pretty easy. Although the Friends program works to bring in a varied demographic and cater to different groups of people, at the end of the day, it is much smaller [than a university alumni group]. It’s easy to go to any committee meeting, join the conversation and have your thoughts heard. You can chart your own course to a much greater extent.
 
How has being part of the Friends impacted you socially and professionally?
It’s definitely a conversation-starter, at its simplest. People learn you are involved with Mount Sinai and they ask about it, and the next thing you know, you’re bringing two or three people to an event and maybe one or two of them join. As far as career development, I think it’s something to talk about. The philanthropic spirit is so strong among the millennial population who want to do something more than just their day-to-day. That spirit really captures, I think, what the Friends program is all about.
 
What has been your favorite event to-date?
I love the Crystal Party [the Mount Sinai Health System’s annual gala] because, personally, I love getting dressed up for events in that spirit. The Friends of Mount Sinai are all seated together under a tent in beautiful Central Park, and it’s a great opportunity to get a large group of people together to achieve common goals.
 
Another favorite, in a more intimate setting, was the Cocktails and Conversation event with Dr. Joel Dudley [director of Mount Sinai’s Next Generation Healthcare Institute and Associate Professor of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Population Health Science and Policy and Medicine]. He spoke about repurposing existing medications to treat things no one ever thought they could be used for...it’s kind of like he sees “the Matrix,” and everyone else hasn’t taken the “red pill” yet.
 
Why do you believe in supporting the Mount Sinai Health System?
In many ways, Mount Sinai has foreseen everything that will be problematic for health care as I age and as baby boomers begin entering their senior years. Mount Sinai leadership is preparing for the challenges this country faces and which the Health System will face as it cares for an increasingly older population. We are seeing mass-consolidation across the health care industry because of the regulations involved and the astronomical overhead costs. Mount Sinai was able to predict this and set the groundwork for adapting to the 21st century of medicine.
 
Why do you find it easy to introduce friends to the Friends of Mount Sinai program?
I think the key “selling point” is that Sinai has a long-standing reputation for providing excellent health care, and a history of innovation and discovery. The Friends of Mount Sinai can be anything you make it: It is population health, it is immunotherapy, and whatever interests you about health care, Mount Sinai covers it, and the Friends can put together events that speak to it.
 
What advice would you give a young professional in New York City considering philanthropic involvement?
Start asking questions. If there is anything you’re interested in or want to support, there is probably a community for it. If not, if it is health care- or community outreach-related, Mount Sinai partners with many other charitable organizations. It is so easy to become involved philanthropically in a city like New York as long as you are willing to take the first step.
 
What are you most looking forward to in the next year?
The group’s continued expansion. We had a Recruitment Committee meeting at the apartment of Rebecca Siegel [Friends of Mount Sinai Vice Chair], and our discussion centered around whether we can bring in people a year or two out of college and engage them. The effort we are putting into expanding the group at every commitment level is a great way to build up the ranks.
 
To learn more about young leadership of the Mount Sinai Health System and the Friends of Mount Sinai, please e-mail friends@mountsinai.org.
 
 

 
“The personalized nature of what we do in the Recruitment Committee is in keeping with the personal attention every Friends member receives.”

 

YOUNG DONOR SPOTLIGHT:
Olivia and Ross Koller

Ross Koller grew up in Rye, New York. He moved to New York City in 2004 to pursue a career in finance and joined the Friends of Mount Sinai in 2006. Olivia Burr Koller grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland and upon graduating from college in 2012, moved to Manhattan to work in publishing. Ross introduced her to the Friends and a year later she joined him in serving on the advisory board. Since 2015, Olivia and Ross have served as co-chairs of the Recruitment Committee. Ross is a partner at Unterberg Capital, an investment firm. Olivia is pursuing a Fine Arts certificate at Parsons, The New School of Design.
 
What originally drew you to the Friends of Mount Sinai?
Ross: In 2003 my mom became sick with cancer and underwent treatment at Mount Sinai. I was impressed by the exceptional care she received from her doctors and surgeons. During this time someone mentioned to me that there was a Mount Sinai group for young professionals and I was interested in getting involved.
 
What was your first impression of the Friends?
Olivia: I was first impressed by the scale of interesting and educational programming available to Friends. As a business major in college, I absolutely avoided the science building. Suddenly, as a young professional, I was given access to world-renowned Mount Sinai doctors and researchers who were presenting their work in social settings. It was fun!
 
How have you benefited from being a Friend of Mount Sinai?
Ross: We’ve made some very good friends, and the programming is phenomenal. In the height of the Ebola crisis, Mount Sinai’s Dr. Chris Basler, Professor of Microbiology and a world expert on the virus, met with about 10 of us over dinner and reassured us that the world was not coming to an end. This level of access to renowned medical experts seems special and rare to me. On top of that, the group operates efficiently; the concerns and ideas we discuss in our respective committees are actually addressed and our voices are heard.
 
How has being a part of the Friends changed your relationship with the Health System?
Ross: The Friends of Mount Sinai has mostly opened my eyes to the reach and impact of the Health System. When my mom was undergoing cancer treatment, my stepfather, mother, and I became close with Dr. Myron Schwartz, respected professor and Director of Liver Surgery at the Recanati/Miller Transplantation Institute. We endowed a fellowship in his department and became familiar with his work.
 
Dr. Richard Golinko, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and Cardiology, also illustrates Mount Sinai’s reach and impact, relaying stories of performing heart surgeries on infants and later dancing at their weddings.
 
What does it mean to be a Recruitment Committee Co-Chair?
Olivia: It gives me the ability to introduce new members to the Friends in the same warm, friendly, helpful way that I was welcomed. The personalized nature of what we do in the Recruitment Committee is in keeping with the personal attention every Friends member receives from staff and from the doctors who meet with us.
 
Unlike many other large philanthropic groups, there is a great deal of personal care given to Friends. This is a massive health system—the biggest in the city—and despite that, I feel I can pick up the phone at any time and the staff will talk through a concern, or I can attend an event and have my questions answered.
 
Ross: We think a lot about how to supplement the usual recruitment process. Our goal is to have new members see friendly, familiar faces when they come to Friends programming. We don’t want anyone to feel lost.
 
How does the Friends of Mount Sinai compare to other philanthropic groups?
Olivia: There are some groups that allow members to do as little or as much as they wish, but here I feel you are expected to actively support the group; there’s a real call-to-action. Our events never seem stale, which makes involvement a pleasure.
 
Why do you continue to be involved a decade on?
Ross: The program is still fresh. It has grown from its purely social beginnings as the “Young Friends” to become the larger, more structured board you see today. I continue to enjoy working with the people involved, and having exposure to doctors speaking on fascinating topics. The cause itself makes my involvement rewarding; the facilities at Mount Sinai are constantly improving and the hospital continues to attract outstanding doctors in increasingly specialized areas.
 
What do you think is the greatest challenge facing the Friends in 2016?
Ross: Maintaining the program’s personalization, as we have grown significantly in the last year. It’s also a challenge to keep the program fun and social. I like that we are now hosting after-parties to our “Cocktails and Conversation” events so that socializing doesn’t end after just two hours.
 
What advice would you give to a young professional seeking philanthropic involvement in the city?
Olivia: First, you have to love the cause; find one you care deeply about. Then, pick the philanthropic program associated with the cause you love that affords you the most opportunities to learn and to meet other people who also care deeply about it. This will sustain your passion for the cause and keep you excited.
 
To learn more about young leadership of the Mount Sinai Health System and the Friends of Mount Sinai, please e-mail friends@mountsinai.org.
 
 

 
“There’s something important and civic-minded about giving back to an institution that gives so much to the community in which one lives…my involvement is very satisfying and rewarding on a personal level.”

 

YOUNG DONOR SPOTLIGHT:
Talia and Tyler Friedman

Talia Katz Friedman and Tyler Friedman grew up in Teaneck, New Jersey and Shaker Heights, Ohio, respectively. Following his graduation from Duke University School of Law in 2006, Tyler moved to New York City and soon after joined the Friends of Mount Sinai. Now a Senior Associate at the law firm of Sullivan & Cromwell, Tyler has served as Chair of the Friends of Mount Sinai since 2012. Talia earned her BA in History and Art History from New York University and is Vice President and Head of the Department of Client Development at Sotheby’s. She was introduced to the Friends in 2009, when the couple began serving on its advisory board. In March, 2014, Talia gave birth to their daughter, Lillian Eleanor Friedman, at The Mount Sinai Hospital.
 
What originally drew you to the Friends of Mount Sinai program?
Tyler: My involvement dates back to September 11, 2001. On a day of tragedy for our city and country, my sister went into labor and gave birth to a beautiful, healthy baby girl at The Mount Sinai Hospital. The Hospital instantly became an important institution in my life. Upon moving to New York in 2006, I was introduced to the Friends of Mount Sinai (at that time known as the ““Young Friends”) as a way to channel my energy in support of the Hospital. This was a group of young people, then in its infancy, dedicated to supporting Mount Sinai. I introduced Talia to the group in 2009.
 
Talia, not having had a personal Mount Sinai experience to that point, what was your first impression of the Friends of Mount Sinai?
Talia: Since the beginning it was wonderful to see that everyone's perspectives are taken into consideration in directing the group. From allocation of funds to event brainstorming, there is a spirit of inclusion at every level. It’s so refreshing to join a leadership group and know that your voice truly matters.
 
How has Friends of Mount Sinai supported you in “committing more fully” to its cause?
The Friends of Mount Sinai volunteer opportunity is philanthropic and educational—providing access to leading physicians so we can understand their research and the health care system in general: not only what it means to be a patient in a hospital, but we are also afforded the administrative perspective of Health System leadership.
 
Tyler, what does your role as Chair of the group entail?
Tyler: Each member of the Friends of Mount Sinai comes to the group with a unique background and life story, but what we all share in common is a steadfast commitment to the growth of Mount Sinai. As Chair, I am responsible for cultivating the group’s connection to the Health System and ensuring that each member supports Mount Sinai in a way that is meaningful to him or her. As an ambassador for Mount Sinai, I engage as many people as possible to learn about the extraordinary patient care and innovative scientific research that are the cornerstones of the Health System.
 
Why is philanthropically supporting Mount Sinai important to you?
Tyler: The more I have learned over the years about the institution and its deep roots in the community, the more important it has become to me to support Mount Sinai. Mount Sinai is an institution with a global footprint, but also—and just as important—our local hospital, committed to providing my family the highest-quality medical care.
 
How has being involved with this group changed your relationship with Mount Sinai?
Talia: In countless ways. To have a front-row seat to all of what Mount Sinai has to offer, and to meet some of its best and brightest along the way, has given me a unique perspective on all that Mount Sinai does for its patients. Mount Sinai is a place where I will always feel at home and in good hands when it comes to my family’s health.
 
What has been your favorite Friends of Mount Sinai event to-date?
Tyler: I think our ”Dinner With a Doctor“ events are the most interesting. Sharing an intimate dinner with one of Mount Sinai’s distinguished researchers or physicians and a handful of Friends—each with a different background—makes for an unforgettably fun evening.
 
Talia: I reflect back to our ”Cocktails and Conversation“ event with Dr. Ross Cagan, a renowned researcher and the Director of Mount Sinai‘s Center for Personalized Cancer Therapeutics, where we learned about innovative approaches to personalized cancer treatment unlike anything I‘d ever heard of. Mount Sinai is at the forefront of this sort of research and hearing from Dr. Cagan in such an intimate setting was something terrific.
 
Why should someone consider becoming involved in young volunteer leadership at Mount Sinai? Tyler: There‘s something important and civic-minded about giving back to an institution that gives so much to the community in which one lives. The volunteer leaders with whom I collaborate at Mount Sinai share the same vision and, as a result, my involvement is very satisfying and rewarding on a personal level.
 
What advice would you give a young professional or young family considering joining a volunteer leadership group? Talia: Get to know where your potential time, energy, and finances will be spent. Also, meet people who are already involved as well as the staff guiding the group. We appreciate that Mount Sinai understands the importance of investing in young leadership and has staff dedicated to the group‘s success. I have friends who are involved in other groups and attend an event once or twice a year but do not feel truly involved. That‘s not us. The Friends of Mount Sinai has real mission and dedicated group of leaders committed to the betterment of the institution.
 
To learn more about young leadership of the Mount Sinai Health System and the Friends of Mount Sinai, please e-mail friends@mountsinai.org.
 
 

 
“I don’t feel like I’m a small part of a large organization. I think Mount Sinai does a great job of thanking all of its donors, both large and small, with unique opportunities.”

 

YOUNG DONOR SPOTLIGHT:
Tracey Hanfling

Tracey Hanfling grew up in Manhasset Hills, New York and has made her home in New York City since 2005. A Director at BlackRock, she joined Friends of Mount Sinai in 2006 and has served on its advisory board since 2009.
 
What originally drew you to the Friends of Mount Sinai program?
My family members are longtime patients of Mount Sinai and have received great care from a handful of wonderful physicians. As a result, I wanted to become more involved with the hospital and learn more about the medical community in general. I met with a Development staff person who told me about a group of young professionals like me who were advocating for the hospital and for advancements in medicine, and I decided to join.
 
Why is supporting Mount Sinai philanthropically important to you?
In terms of my volunteer work, I dedicate myself more fully to just a few organizations or causes that are important to me, rather than supporting lots of causes in smaller ways. Early on, Mount Sinai became important not only because of the family connection but also because I enjoy learning about medicine, health care, legislation related to health care, and research. Mount Sinai is on the cutting-edge of all of these things due to its dual focus on patient care and research representing some of the wealthiest and poorest areas of New York City.
 
How has Friends of Mount Sinai supported you in “committing more fully” to its cause?
The Friends of Mount Sinai volunteer opportunity is philanthropic and educational—providing access to leading physicians so we can understand their research and the health care system in general: not only what it means to be a patient in a hospital, but we are also afforded the administrative perspective of Health System leadership.
 
What has been your favorite Friends of Mount Sinai event to-date?
One of my favorite educational events was a Cocktails and Conversation event [featuring Dr. Ross Cagan, Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Biological Sciences and Director of the Center for Personalized Cancer Therapeutics] in which we learned about the discovery of customized cancer treatments using, incredibly, fruit flies. Another favorite involved learning about robotic surgery techniques and how this technology is making surgery safer. To see clinicians and researchers whose work is significant and potentially life-changing, and be able to ask them about something that has personal significance for you, your family, your work, or a friend is unique.
 
How has being involved with this group changed your relationship with Mount Sinai?
At the most fundamental level, any time a family member or friend needs care, it’s the first place I think of going. There’s a comfort in knowing that we can receive the highest level of care and get great referrals to top physicians across all fields of medicine.
 
How do you feel so closely involved in a Health System that is so large?
Given Mount Sinai’s size, it would be easy to feel like a small part of a large entity but there is a very personal philanthropic focus here. Because we’re invited to many of the same events a trustee would be invited to, and because we have the same opportunities to hear from the hospital’s leadership, I don’t feel like I’m a small part of a large organization. Mount Sinai does a great job of thanking all of its donors, both large and small, with unique opportunities.
 
What advice would you have for a young professional considering becoming involved in the Friends of Mount Sinai?
Don’t just give money. If you’re interested in the medical field, fully embrace the opportunities that the Friends of Mount Sinai program provides. Get to know other members—everyone is willing to sit down and chat. And attend the events—I am consistently fascinated by the work taking place here and find myself telling friends, family, and colleagues what I have learned first-hand from physicians and researchers at Mount Sinai.
 
To learn more about young leadership of the Mount Sinai Health System and the Friends of Mount Sinai, please e-mail friends@mountsinai.org.
 
 

 
Friends of Mount Sinai
 

Who We Are

Friends of Mount Sinai is a group of young professional leaders and families with a personal interest in the Mount Sinai Health System. The Friends share a passion for the importance of excellence in patient care, medical research, and education in their community.
 
Friends of Mount Sinai welcomes anyone interested in beginning or furthering a relationship with the Mount Sinai Health System. Friends are granted unparalleled access to Mount Sinai’s top physicians, scientists, and medical professionals through educational and social events and activities. In addition, Friends gain an insider’s perspective on the exciting advances in health care and research occurring at Mount Sinai. We hope that through these efforts Friends will develop a deeper understanding of the value and importance of engaging philanthropically with the Health System.

 
 

What We Do

Because Friends of Mount Sinai understands the importance of fostering strong relationships with young leaders, it offers members exclusive educational, social, and networking opportunities. Events range from “Cocktails and Conversation” socials to intimate “Dinner with a Doctor” evenings. Recent venues include 21 Club, Essex House, and Norwood Club.
 
Friends have myriad opportunities to learn about and support the latest advances in medicine and patient care at Mount Sinai while connecting with peers and hospital leadership. Friends invest in the success and growth of Mount Sinai by working together toward the goals of the Health System. Friends make an annual philanthropic commitment and are encouraged to fulfill it through a combination of personal gifts and ticketed events in support of the Health System areas of greatest importance to them.
 
A few of the many programs Friends have supported include the Young Scientist Cancer Research Fund of The Tisch Cancer Institute, the Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department, the East Harlem Health Outreach Partnership, the Jack Martin Fund Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, and the Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program.
 
Friends of Mount Sinai is governed by a Board of volunteer leaders, who may also serve on an Executive Board and on committees.
 
The ultimate goal of Friends of Mount Sinai is to set its members on a path of increasing volunteer leadership as their understanding of and relationship with the Health System grows.

 
 

Friends Annual Giving Levels
Couples making a joint gift are each granted membership in the Friends of Mount Sinai

SUPPORTER
($500+)

  • Invitations to select Friends events, including:
  • • Cocktails & Conversation
  • • Private group tour of The Mount Sinai Hospital
  • • Friends in Service event
  • Invitations to benefit events and additional educational events
  • Subscription to Mount Sinai Science & Medicine

BENEFACTOR
($1,000+)

  • Receives all of the opportunities afforded to Supporters, plus:
  • Invitation to the Mount Sinai Crystal Party at a special Friends-member rate

PHILANTHROPIST
($2,500+)

  • Receives all of the opportunities afforded to Benefactors, plus:
  • Eligible for Friends Committee service
  • Invitations to Dinner with a Doctor events

LEADERSHIP
($5,000+)

  • Receives all of the opportunities afforded to Philanthropists, plus:
  • Eligible for Friends Board service
  • Eligible to host Friends events
  • Invitations to VIP Mount Sinai Health System events
  • Eligible to co-chair select Health System events
 

Leadership- and Philanthropist-level commitments are tax-deductible less $150; Benefactor- and Supporter-level commitments are tax-deductible less $50.

 
 

Friends of Mount Sinai Board
As of January 1, 2017

  • CHAIR
  • Tyler Friedman
  •  
    VICE CHAIRS
  • Alexander Krug
  • Harris Mufson
  • David Richman
  • Rebecca Siegel
  •  
    EDUCATION COMMITTEE
    CO-CHAIRS
  • Rachel and Joshua Crane
  • Holly and Michael Schechter
  •  
    RECRUITMENT COMMITTEE
    CO-CHAIRS
  • Samantha Cohen
  • Jonathan Dixon
  • Olivia and Ross Koller
  •  
    SOCIAL AND SERVICE
    COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS
  • Alana and Alexander Krug
  • Dayna and Thomas Sessa
  • Alexandra and Michael Toccin
     
  • BOARD MEMBERS
  • Michelle Aragon and Lee Walling
  • Nina and Eliav Assouline
  • Jodi and Jordan Barrow
  • Andrea and Adam Burinescu
  • Diana Cheung
  • Samantha Cohen
  • Rachel and Joshua Crane
  • Rabbi Darcie and Jonathan Crystal
  • Nicole and Joshua Dickstein
  • Jonathan Dixon
  • Elissa and David Emden
  • Darin and John Eydenberg
  • Melinda and Marc Feinberg
  • Lauren and Peter Feld
  • Joshua Friedman
  • Erica and Joshua S. Friedman
  • Talia and Tyler Friedman
  • Jordana and Andrew Fruchter
  • James Gallo
  • Jennifer and Alan Goldfarb
  • Tracey Hanfling
  • Susan Kasser
  • Celia and Jason Hoffman
  • Loren Guttman Klein and Casey Klein
  • Amy and Jonathan Knepper
  • Ali and Matt Knopman
  • Brittany and Matthew Kohn
  • Olivia and Ross Koller
  • Alana and Alexander Krug
  • Jed F. Lenzner
  • Elizabeth and Jonathan Lewinsohn
  • Lauren Liles
  • Alexa and Brett Mufson
  • Michal and Harris Mufson
  • Sarah and Harish Nataraj
  • Arianne and Hugh O’Kane
  • Karen and David Richman
  • Ross Rodrigues
  • Jordan Rubin
  • Kaitlin and Jordan Sasson
  • Haley and Matthew Satnick
  • Holly and Michael Schechter
  • Dayna and Thomas Sessa
  • Hillary and David Sherman
  • Carolyn Sicher, PhD and Aaron Woolf
  • Rebecca Ann Siegel
  • Catherine and Joshua Smith
  • Morielle Strauss and Eric Hoffman
  • Alexandra and Michael Toccin
  • Jocelyn and Jonathan Wagner
  • Sarah and Andrew Washkowitz
  • Rachel and Ronnie Wexler
  • Elizabeth Shaoul Wilens and
    Michael Wilens
  •  
    HONORARY BOARD MEMBERS
  • Rebecca Amaru, MD
  • Isabel Blumberg, MD
  • Lynn Friedman, MD
  • Stephanie Freilich, MD
  • Shari Leipzig, MD
  • Carly Snyder, MD
 

 
“The better health care becomes, the better your future becomes. In such a small way, you can impact the quality of life of so many.”

Michal Mufson

 

YOUNG DONOR SPOTLIGHT:
Michal and Harris Mufson

Michal Fromer Mufson is originally from Great Neck, New York, and Harris Mufson from Boca Raton, Florida. Michal has a BA degree from George Washington University and a Master’s Degree from New York University, both in English Literature. Michal is the owner of online retail store Navy and Lavender.
 
In 2006, Harris moved to New York City following his graduation from the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Harris is currently senior counsel at Proskauer Rose LLP, where he practices in the firm’s vaunted labor and employment group. Michal and Harris’ two children, Rowan and Julian, were born at The Mount Sinai Hospital.
 
What originally drew you to the Friends of Mount Sinai?
Harris: In 2013, Tyler Friedman [current Chair of the Friends of Mount Sinai and personal friend] and I talked about his involvement in the Friends of Mount Sinai, and the fact that I had a professional connection to Mount Sinai, and also that our son was born at the Hospital in 2011. Tyler invited us to a Cocktails & Conversation event with Dr. Kenneth Davis [Mount Sinai Health System President and CEO]. At the time, I was generally familiar with Mount Sinai but we learned a great deal more about the Health System that night and decided to offer our resources and time in supporting the institution. We feel it is among the most important institutions in New York City, and we wanted to do our part to support it.
 
Four years later, why is supporting Mount Sinai philanthropically important to you?
Michal: I think it is essential to have the next generation of donors continue the Health System’s meaningful work. Mount Sinai is on the front lines of research and development in areas that other health systems aren’t even paying attention to, and the Friends of Mount Sinai is a bridge between current and future donors. The Cocktails & Conversation events offer a fascinating look at what the Health System does, aside from providing excellent medical care, offering a look into the future of medicine.
 
Living in downtown New York City in Greenwich Village, why did you choose to make Mount Sinai your family’s health home?
Harris: Mount Sinai now has locations all over the city following the 2013 merger with Continuum Health Partners. Regardless of the fact that The Mount Sinai Hospital is on the Upper East Side, we still see Mount Sinai physicians downtown. As one example, there is now a large facility in Union Square [Phillips Ambulatory Care Center], and we expect more facilities to continue to pop up.
 
Michal: The physicians we want to care for our family are affiliated with Mount Sinai. We know that if we had to access urgent care, the private practices that we go to would be able to treat us at a Mount Sinai Hospital.
 
What does it mean to you to be “volunteer leaders?”
We are proud to be affiliated with the institution and consider ourselves ambassadors for Mount Sinai—championing the various causes we learn about. For us, supporting the Health System is a life–long endeavor, and the relationship is bilateral: we hope to avail ourselves—though hopefully not too soon!—of the headway that Mount Sinai is making in the future of medicine, and to be beneficiaries of that. It’s our pleasure to support the institution.
 
Why was it important to you to host a Friends of Mount Sinai Dinner with a Doctor event?
Michal: It was an enjoyable experience having a renowned physician at our home, speaking to our friends in an intimate setting. The event generated a lot of interest in joining the Friends and in attending other events.
 
Harris: It was a unique experience to engage with a Mount Sinai faculty member on a more personal level, and provided the opportunity to develop a relationship with a physician we otherwise would not have access to.
 
Harris, what does it mean to you to serve as a Vice Chair of the Friends of Mount Sinai?
It’s furthering my commitment to Mount Sinai and demonstrating the significance of Mount Sinai in my personal and professional life. The Friends of Mount Sinai is a great organization, and serving in a leadership role within the group gives me a unique opportunity to sustain the group and to help it expand.
 
How has being involved with the Friends changed your relationship with Mount Sinai?
Michal: On a personal level, we are always recommending Mount Sinai for any health care our friends may need, whether it’s a specialist, a place to deliver a first child, or a Health System to be affiliated with. We now have a personal interest and investment in the Health System, and we’re always trying to get others involved, whether for an event or for their personal health.
 
Why should someone consider becoming involved with the Friends of Mount Sinai?
Harris: It’s an opportunity to network with likeminded individuals who are committed to supporting Mount Sinai, and to become connected with information and individuals you wouldn’t otherwise necessarily be. You are also afforded the opportunity to learn about certain research endeavors which, unless you read medical journals, you likely wouldn’t know about. It’s a tremendous opportunity to gain insight into the forefront of medical breakthroughs.
 
What advice would you have for a young family considering philanthropic involvement with a Health System in NYC?
Harris: There’s no shortage of organizations to support in New York City, but I think supporting a health care institution is particularly rewarding given their broad scope, reach, and ability to touch many people’s lives in the city and in the world. I think it’s a particularly fantastic field to support, especially when you’re building a young family where health is of primary importance, both yours and that of your children.
 
Michal: You’re not just donating money but you’re also making an investment: The better health care becomes, the better your future becomes. In such a small way, you can impact the quality of life of so many.
 
To learn more about young leadership of the Mount Sinai Health System and the Friends of Mount Sinai, please e-mail friends@mountsinai.org

 
 

To learn more about opportunities to support Friends of Mount Sinai, please contact:
 
Caitlin McFeely
Associate Director of Annual Programs
friends@mountsinai.org
646-605-8834
 
One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1049
New York, NY 10029